Model 1889 Schmidt-Rubin Repeating Rifle ………….SOLD

Created on March 22nd 2018

Model 1889 Swiss Infantry Rifle and matching (Dolchbajonett) bayonetDSC_0398

An interesting and rare opportunity to purchase a fully matching Swiss M1889 and the bayonet it was issued with!  We are all used to seeing matching Swiss rifles by Schmidt-Rubin but, the days of matching rifles with bayonets are becoming more and more scarce. This is one of those opportunities, to add to your collection, a rifle and bayonet that have stayed together since the day they were issued back in 1895.  That’s 122 years ago folks !  This fine Schmidt-Rubin is in excellent “sleeper” condition as far as collecting terms are concerned.  Overall, the rifle has a dull smoky patina which can only develop from years on no interference from man nor elements.  It would be up to the personal discretion of the new owner  to have the rifle cleaned or to leave it much as it is now.  We are only custodians or keepers of these historic pieces.  The men that crafted and made them are long gone.  All that remains is their excellent standard of workmanship and the individual inspection and acceptance marks that subtly adorne these historic pieces.

DSC_0413DSC_0408DSC_0406DSC_0404DSC_0405DSC_0399

The rifle is 51.3/8 long.  The round blued barrel is 30.1/2 long with an inverted crown on the muzzle.  The trigger pull is 12.3/8″ to center.  The stock is full-length and made in European straight grained walnut with finger groves and an over-barrel handguard.  The rifle is chambered in the Swiss 7.5 x 53.5mm cartridge.  It has a twelve shot, retractable box magazine that can be stripper-clip loaded.  Imagine the firepower at the time – a section of riflemen trained to a fine degree of accuracy, poring fire down on a potential invader – you wouldn’t want to stick your head up above the parapet too often to see what was going on !  The rate of fire sustainable with the rapid action of the straight pull mechanism would have put up a wall of steel that would be hard to argue with!  And, Switzerland remained neutral and people sometimes wonder how ? !!

DSC_0400DSC_0402DSC_0403

As previously mentioned, all numbers match on this 1889 rifle; as seen by the receiver number “190931″, being repeated on the barrel, the bolt, the magazine and the last three digits on the butt-plate tang.  Quite clearly, the Swiss proof mark is on the crest of the barrel, which consists of a Swiss cross over “V” within one stamping.  The receiver has the three distinctive lightening cuts longitudinally machined into its length.  More interesting markings are clearly showing on the receiver.  The most obvious is the barrel registration mark, the Swiss cross. Between the two is the reversed “B P” firing proof.  At the end of its service life this rifle was sold of to the last user, this is indicated by a large “P” hand stamped over “32.” Other Swiss proof, inspectors marks and ordnance acceptance marks are all over the weapon in the usual places, including the Verterlli type sights where each part is individually marked.  The rear sights are graduated from 300 to 2000 meters on the LHS of the sight body.

DSC_0417DSC_0418

DSC_0419DSC_0415DSC_0411DSC_0407

The top of the butt stock, at the tang, shows many marks of interest;  The tang itself has the last three digits of the serial number and the Swiss cross.  Just forward of the tang is a very obvious “6″ within a circle.  The numeral is about 12mm in height, the circle is interrupted at the top by a “1″ and an “A” applied at a later date at the six o’clock position.  Beneath those markings is another boxed cartouche which appears to read; “D6 Swiss cross C1″ – meaning unknown.  Single mid-band with sling swivel.  Front nose band with stacking hook and bayonet mount.  Magazine switch mounted on RHS which pulls magazine down to take it out of battery.  Bolt release on same side, towards rear of action.  Three grooved bore with strong rifling in very good condition with minimal signs of use.  Mechanically good action.  Period leather sling attached is marked with the makers name and town, it looks to read “J.J. WETTER / UTERBRURGH”.

DSC_0409

An interesting and important stage in rifle development which currently benefits from being on the Section 58(ii) Home Office list of obsolete calibres.  This means one may posses without a section one Firearms license.  Should you wish to use it the rifle has to be added to said license.

£ 595.   for Rifle

£ 145.   for Bayonet

SOLD

Comments Off