Excellent 1941 K98 Mauser by Steyr……..(f 541)……….SOLD

Created on November 22nd 2015

An almost completely matching K98 by Steyr

K98 Mauser f 541 001

The “bnz  / 41″ coding on the receiver of this excellent K98 indicates production at Steyr-Daimler-Puch A G, Steyr, Austria in 1941.  The serial number which is clearly legible on the RHS of the receiver and barrel is “3108 l.”  This is repeated on all metal worked parts except for the cocking piece which is the rearmost bolt component.  It actually has the number “1352″ Even the cupped butt-plate is correctly numbers even though it was contracted out to Johannes Grossfuss of Dobeln, Saxony.  Otherwise every single component on this rifle, that should be is correctly numbered to this rifle.  It is reasonable therefore to conceive that the cocking piece was lost or became un-serviceable and was replaced at some time.

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One can not stress too much how many components on this rifle are correctly marked with the serial number or part of the serial number.  Even the firing pin and the trigger components have the number upon them.  There are photos of all these parts upon request.  The rifle was completely stripped down and as we got deeper into the works of the weapon we were finding more and more numbered components and wondering where it would stop!  It did not.  It also has additional, what are thought to be good luck talisman markings on various parts.  Most noticeably the jumping man with his lucky willie!  The easiest of these to see appears on the underside of the matching rear sight ramp, towards the base pin.  There are also the original barrel makers marks and an interesting star on the barrel and the underside of the receiver.   The wood work upper and lower are internally stamed with the serial number.  The main screws which fix the action to the stock are numbered “08″.

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To add to the superb numbering markings are the numerous but correct factory inspector waffenamts.  Most numerous is the “77″.  Additionally there is a clear barrel makers stamp rolled into the top rear of the barrel; “212 40Bo ” then three “623 waffenamts”  this is the code for acceptance and inspection at Steyr.  ”Bo” is the code for a barrel made at the Bohler steel works Austria.  So even the barrel proves to be original to the rifle.

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I can not fault this rifle as a fine, rare collectible yet shoot-able historic K98 Rifle.  Finding a fully matching K98 now commands a high premium. In the US where matching examples  are usually found  it is quite normal to get out bid.  Up to $6000 for such a rifle has been parted with, and that would be without the ability to fully inspect it.  In this case we have the photographic evidence to prove that this rifle is 98% fully matching and even has a lucky Willie thrown in for good measure.

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 Cosmetically, the finish over the whole of this fine Mauser is absolutely as it should be – excellent dark plum-browns with some high edge wear.  The bore is very good and the rifle was proofed in London within the last four years. Included is a period fore-sight protector, an un-numbered cleaning rod and a new reproduction leather side mounted sling.  The laminated stock shows little sign of any serious use apart from a couple of gouges on the comb of the butt.  In military collecting terms the rifle is a “Sleeper”.

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By Sword & Musket are often asked for matching K98s and to tell the honest truth we had all but given up on finding them.  Instead, we have been concentration on finding German rifles with good bores.  Matching numbered examples have all but disappeared – this is the best chance to get near to that golden fleece that has surfaced in a long long time.

Viewing highly recommended for the serious collector of classic battle rifles.  Now is the time, he who hesitates……..

K98 Mauser f 541 027

Stock No’  f 541

£ 1895…….SOLD

 

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